Course Catalog

Learn about the current online courses offered through the BibleMesh Institute

Biblical Interpretation

Based on the popular textbook Grasping God’s Word by Old Testament scholar J. Daniel Hays and New Testament expert J. Scott Duvall, this course provides a simple and clear introduction to reading the Word of God carefully and in context, interpreting it, and then applying it faithfully. Designed to follow Hays and Duvall’s memorable “Interpretive Journey” framework, this course equips students with foundational, trustworthy principles of sound biblical interpretation.

The Biblical Story: Full Bible Survey is a course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, this OT and NT survey demonstrates the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This course is divided into 7 Eras (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel, After the Exile, Jesus, and the Church).

The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story NT Survey covering Eras 5-7 (After the Exile, Jesus, and the Church).

The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story OT Survey covering Eras 1-4 (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel).

New Testament

In this course NT scholar Robert H. Gundry provides essential historical and cultural background information and carefully examines the content of each book in the New Testament. Topics and issues discussed in the course are tied to assigned readings from the across the entire New Testament. Students encounter commentary on the various readings to provide additional insight and guide them in the interpretive process.
This course provides and introductory survey to the study of the Gospel accounts in the New Testament. It examines the nature and content of each of the four books, and will consider their historical, religious, and cultural backgrounds. Additionally, it examines questions surrounding the study of the four books, including the historical Jesus, the historical reliability of the gospels, and the teaching and actions of Jesus.
This course introduces the cultural and theological background of Hebrews and the general epistles (James through Jude). Taught from an evangelical perspective by respected New Testament scholar Karen Jobes, the course addresses issues of historical relevance as well as connecting these ancient Scriptural books to Christian faith and practice today. Letters to the Church covers historical background for each book focusing on authorship, genre, date, and content, as well as an exploration of the major themes in each book.
The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story OT Survey covering Eras 1-4 (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel).

This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Peter H. Davids, offers a comprehensive exploration of the theology of James, 1-2 Peter, and Jude, including introductory issues and major themes, and also shows how each book relates to the broad picture of New Testament theology.

In this course, New Testament scholars Bruce W. Longenecker and Todd D. Still offer students a thorough introduction to the life of the apostle Paul and the New Testament books he authored. This course seeks to situate study of the apostle in proper perspective by first looking at Paul’s life before and after his encounter with the risen Christ en route to Damascus. It then examines each of Paul’s letters individually, before finally synthesizing the Pauline writings in order to highlight the main strands of Paul’s theologizing—all the while keeping in mind the particular context of first-century Christianity.
In this course, notable scholar Thomas R. Schreiner offers students a focused introduction to deeper study of Galatians. Through graphic representations of translations and succinct summaries of main ideas, Schreiner presents Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians with precision and accuracy. Focused on the textual structure of the book, the Galatians course enables students to better understand the literary elements of Galatians. Students will also come to better comprehend the author’s revolutionary goals and the book’s vital implication for the church today.
This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Gary M. Burge, examines the meaning of John’s Gospel and its application in the twenty-first century. Students will learn about the text itself, explore issues in John’s culture and in ours that help us understand the ultimate meaning of each passage, and discover ways in which the theology of the book of John can be understood and lived out in modern culture.
This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Douglas Moo, provides students with an overview to the book of Romans. Students receive commentary on the text itself, explore issues in Paul’s culture and the present day that help provide understanding of the ultimate meaning of each passage, and suggests ways in which the eternal theology of Romans can be understood and lived out in modern culture.

Old Testament

This course explores the literary, historical, and theological issues behind the Old Testament and its various books. Featuring material from Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton, the course aims to guide students in knowing God and understanding his redemptive work more fully. For each Old Testament book, this course addresses background information, purpose, message, structure, and major themes, while considering issues such as interpretation, geography, archaeology, history, formation of the Old Testament canon, and the Old Testament’s relationship to the New Testament.

This course introduces the content of the first five books of the Old Testament, considering background material and the theology of each book, and how each book fits in the story of salvation. Examining the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the course focuses on narrative and intertextuality. The course’s priority is to help students gain a working knowledge of the scriptural accounts themselves, as well as an awareness of how they fit within the larger biblical context.

This course offers a survey of the entire book of Genesis that explores its message in light of the Bible’s grand story. This course focuses on the interpretation of Genesis within its historical and literary context in order to guide readers today to live out God’s story faithfully in their own context. In line with this purpose, OT scholar Tremper Longman III helpfully organizes the material of each passage into three sections: Listen to the Story; Explain the Story; and Live the Story. This story-centric approach facilitates a deeper understanding of the book of Genesis in today’s world.

This course offers a survey of the Old Testament prophetic literature that presents the message of each prophet in its historical and biblical context and then tracks that message through the New Testament to challenge students with what it means for them today. Featuring material from J. Daniel Hays, this course focuses on synthesizing the message of the prophets, which enables students to grasp the major contours of the prophetic books clearly and concisely. After identifying what the message meant for ancient Israel, Hays helps students to move toward theological application today, enabling them to gain a better understanding of God and the relationship between God and his people.

Theology

This course explores the literary, historical, and theological issues behind the Old Testament and its various books. Featuring material from Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton, the course aims to guide students in knowing God and understanding his redemptive work more fully. For each Old Testament book, this course addresses background information, purpose, message, structure, and major themes, while considering issues such as interpretation, geography, archaeology, history, formation of the Old Testament canon, and the Old Testament’s relationship to the New Testament.

Featuring video lectures by  Wayne Grudem along with his published Systematic Theology, this course introduces the doctrines of God’s Word, God, and humanity, providing a strong emphasis on the scriptural basis for each doctrine; clear teaching, with technical terms kept to a minimum; and a contemporary approach.

Featuring video lectures by Wayne Grudem along with his published Systematic Theology, this course introduces the doctrines of Christ, the Holy Spirit, redemption, the church, and the future, providing a strong emphasis on the scriptural basis for each doctrine; clear teaching, with technical terms kept to a minimum; and a contemporary approach.

Incorporating the textbook Know Why You Believe by K. Scott Oliphint along with teaching videos by the author, this course introduces you to compelling reasons for a belief in God, the Bible, and the foundational teachings of the Christian faith.

Structured from the textbook Moral Choices by ethicist and professor Scott Rae, this course is designed to help students develop a sound and current basis for making ethical decisions in today’s complex postmodern culture — not only outlining the distinctive elements of Christian ethics while avoiding undue dogmatism, but also introducing other ethical systems and their key historical proponents, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Immanuel Kant.

Featuring video lectures and commentary by scholar Gregg Allison, this course presents the historical development of theology by a topical-chronological arrangement, setting out the history one doctrine at a time. This approach concentrates on major tenets of Christian doctrine, exploring its formulation in the early church through the Middle Ages, Reformation, and post-Reformation era, and finally into the modern period. This course provides a thorough introduction to the development of the doctrines of Scripture, God, Humanity, and Sin.

Featuring video lectures and commentary by scholar Gregg Allison, this course presents the historical development of theology by a topical-chronological arrangement, setting out the history one doctrine at a time. This approach concentrates on major tenets of Christian doctrine, exploring its formulation in the early church through the Middle Ages, Reformation, and post-Reformation era, and finally into the modern period. This course provides a thorough introduction to the development of the doctrines of Christ, the Holy Spirit, Redemption, the Church, and the Last Things.

Based on material from Justin Holcomb, this course provides an overview of the main historical developments in Christian thought by exploring the historical context and theological contributions of thirteen historic creeds and councils in church history. It aims to provide an introduction to various traditions within Christian history and to explore the ways the church has wrestled with the most important questions concerning Christian belief.

This course provides on overview of the doctrine of the Trinity, with an eye towards consideration of how the doctrine is a spiritual exercise, and how it influences the interpretation of scripture and the task of theology as whole. Utilizing material from Fred Sanders, this course covers such topics as the nature of language and knowledge related to the God’s self-revelation, inter-Trinitarian relations and the specific mission of the Son and Holy Spirit, and the task of a Trinitarian interpretation of the Old and New Testament.

History

Based on material from Everett Ferguson, this course offers a contextual overview of how the Christian church developed and spread. This genesis and expansion did not occur in a vacuum, but in a setting of times, cultures, and events that both influenced and were influenced by the church. This course examines the link between world history and church history. In particular, it explores the church’s development from the days of Jesus to the years preceding the Reformation. It surveys the Roman, Greek, and Jewish worlds; the church’s relationship to the Roman Empire; the roles of art and architecture, literature and philosophy in church history; and much more, spanning the first through thirteenth centuries.
Based on material from John D. Woodbridge and Frank A. James III, this course offers a contextual overview of how the Christian church spread and developed from the period just prior to the Reformation through the twentieth century. This course also examines the link between world history and church history, detailing the times, cultures, and events that both influenced and were influenced by the church. Primary attention is given to the history of Christianity in the West, but the course also covers developments in Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

Greek

In this course students are introduced to the fundamentals of biblical Greek. Utilizing material from Bill Mounce, students study pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, with particular focus on Greek nouns, pronouns, and indicative verbs. Students will gain exposure to frequently-appearing words in the Greek New Testament, develop skills to parse nouns, pronouns, and verbs, and produce translations of basic sentences.
In this course students continue their study of the fundamentals of biblical Greek. Utilizing material from Bill Mounce, students study vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, with particular focus on Greek nouns, pronouns, and indicative verbs. Students will gain exposure to frequently-appearing words in the Greek New Testament, develop skills to parse most Greek forms in the NT, and produce translations of sentences with limited aids.
This course is the first of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students study pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate chapters 1–3 of the Gospel of John with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse verb and noun forms, consider verbal tense and aspect, and translate basic texts. This course requires that students complete non-credit BibleMesh’s First Steps course prior to beginning.
This course is the second of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5–7) with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse more complex verb, noun, and pronoun forms, consider verbal mood, and translate intermediate texts.

Supported by the textbook Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics // Basics of New Testament Syntax by Daniel B. Wallace along with teaching videos by the author, this course introduces second-year Greek students to syntax and exegesis of the Greek New Testament.

This course is the third of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate First Thessalonians with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse most Greek forms and translate difficult NT texts with limited aids.

In this course students will learn about discourse features of biblical narrative as they read through the first half of the Gospel of Mark. Course concepts include the discourse-level function of Greek conjunctions, background and foreground analysis, principles of Greek word order, and analyzing structural boundaries. Students will see how these concepts offer powerful exegetical insights into the meaning of the Gospel of Mark.

Hebrew

In this course students take the first step towards fluency in biblical Hebrew. Students learn the core mechanics of biblical Hebrew, including basic vocabulary, the verb stems, grammar, syntax, as well as how to use the apparatus in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS), or Hebrew Old Testament.

In this course students continue their study of Hebrew, learning the remaining verbal conjugations (Imperative, Cohortative, and Jussive), infinitives, participles, sentence syntax, and weak and strong verbs in the various verbal stems (Niphal, Piel, Pual, Hiphil, Hophal, Hithpael).

In this course students are introduced to basic biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax while reading and translating Jonah chapters 1, 3 and 4. Additionally students strengthen their skills through reading and translating the whole of the book of Ruth, with emphasis given to developing reading and composition skills and considerations of exegesis and history of interpretation.

In this course students continue their study of basic biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax while reading and translating 1 Kings 17-20. Additionally students strengthen their skills through reading and translating Exodus 1-4, with emphasis given to developing reading and composition skills and considerations of exegesis and history of interpretation.

In this course students will continue to learn Hebrew grammar and vocabulary by translating Genesis 37-41 and Deuteronomy 4–6. Building on what you have learned in Hebrew Reading 1 and 2, you will master Level 3 grammar topics and, upon completion, you will know all vocabulary that appears in Genesis 37–41 and Deuteronomy 4–6. Your guided reading of these Old Testament chapters will thus deepen your understanding of the structure and forms of Hebrew narrative.

In this course students will continue to learn Hebrew grammar and vocabulary by translating Genesis 1-4 and selections from Genesis 11–22. Building on what you have learned in Hebrew Reading 1, 2 and 3 you will master Level 4 grammar topics as well as be introduced some of the features of Biblical Hebrew poetry and, upon completion, you will know all vocabulary that appears in the texts from Genesis you have studied.

Latin

This course is designed to bring new students to a reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. Students are introduced to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd noun declensions; nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative, and vocative cases; 3rd person present active/passive indicative verb forms, all forms of all types of adjectives in the positive degree, and over 200 Latin vocabulary words.

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers demonstratives and relative pronouns, 4th and 5th noun declensions, deponents, infinitives and participles. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress from reading simplified passages from the Vulgate to lightly edited passages.

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers the imperfect and future tenses, adverbs, gerunds, future passive participles, and gerundives, present subjunctive. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress to be able to read unadapted verses and passages from the Vulgate.  

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers the perfect verb system, future active participles and supines, perfect and future infinitives, narrative and contrafactual uses of the subjunctive. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress to be able to read unadapted passages from the Vulgate and Reformation-era translations of the Bible.

Pastoral Ministry

This course presents a collection of biblical principles to introduce students the practice of organic outreach in ministry and evangelism. Among principles taught are sharing the Gospel wherever God has placed the believer and tailoring an evangelism strategy that fits each believer’s unique personality and giftedness. In this practical study Kevin Harney offers the tools needed to reach out with God’s love in organic ways.
This courses teaches students to prepare and deliver sound biblical sermons that connect with their audiences in a meaningful way. The course begins with instruction in moving from the biblical text to contemporary application. Because solid biblical interpretation must be married to the art of contemporary communication in order to bring the message home, the course also covers understanding an audience, developing applications, using illustrations well, and delivering sermons effectively. The concluding units discuss unique preaching approaches to various biblical genres.

World Religions

This course, based on the textbook Understanding World Religions: An Interdisciplinary Approach by professor Irving Hexham, presents religion as a complex and intriguing matrix of history, philosophy, culture, beliefs, and practices. Including video lectures by the author, this course explores the world’s broad sweep of religions under the categories of African religions, the Yogic traditions (including Buddhism), and the Abrahamic traditions.

World Religions

This course, based on the textbook Understanding World Religions: An Interdisciplinary Approach by professor Irving Hexham, presents religion as a complex and intriguing matrix of history, philosophy, culture, beliefs, and practices. Including video lectures by the author, this course explores the world’s broad sweep of religions under the categories of African religions, the Yogic traditions (including Buddhism), and the Abrahamic traditions.

Third Millennium

This course offers an introduction to the history, literature, and cultural context of the Old Testament, with specific focus given to the interpretation and theology of the Pentateuch and its relation to the overarching narrative of Scripture. Students will study the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, with guidance from materials from Third Millennium Ministries.
This course offers an introduction to the history, literature, and cultural context of the Old Testament, with specific focus given to the interpretation and theology of the Prophets and the Writings, along with the overarching themes of kingdom and covenant throughout the Old Testament. Students will study Old Testament books, with guidance from materials from Third Millennium Ministries.
This course offers an introduction to the history, literature, and cultural context of the New Testament, with specific focus given to the interpretation and theology of the Gospels, and the relationship of the New Testament to the Old Testament through the themes of kingdom and covenant. Students will study the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and Acts, with guidance from materials from Third Millennium Ministries.
This course offers an introduction to the history, literature, and cultural context of the New Testament, with specific focus given to the interpretation and theology of the Pauline epistles, the general epistles, and the book of Revelation. Students will study New Testament books, with guidance from materials from Third Millennium Ministries.
This course offers an introduction to the history of the Christian church and the development of doctrine throughout the four major eras: Patristic, Medieval, Reformation, and Modern. With guidance from material from Third Millennium Ministries, special attention is given to historic creeds and confessions, along with major figures, controversies, and councils.
This course offers an introduction to the foundations of Christian theology through the study of the doctrines of Prolegomena, Revelation, God, Humanity, and Sin. With guidance from material from Third Millennium Ministries, this course covers the nature of the task of theology, the major biblical, historical, and systematic contours of each doctrine, and their significance for Christian life.
This course offers an introduction to the foundations of Christian theology through the study of the doctrines of Christ, Salvation, the Holy Spirit, the Church, and the End Times. With guidance from material from Third Millennium Ministries, this course covers the major biblical, historical, and systematic contours of each doctrine, and their significance for Christian life.
This course offers an overview of the Bible’s system of morality in terms of ethical standards, goals, and motives while equipping Christians to understand biblical standards in application to modern dilemmas. With guidance from material from Third Millennium Ministries, students will develop skills of interpretation of scripture and its application to contemporary ethical dilemmas.

Pastoral Ministry

This course presents a collection of biblical principles to introduce students the practice of organic outreach in ministry and evangelism. Among principles taught are sharing the Gospel wherever God has placed the believer and tailoring an evangelism strategy that fits each believer’s unique personality and giftedness. In this practical study Kevin Harney offers the tools needed to reach out with God’s love in organic ways.
This courses teaches students to prepare and deliver sound biblical sermons that connect with their audiences in a meaningful way. The course begins with instruction in moving from the biblical text to contemporary application. Because solid biblical interpretation must be married to the art of contemporary communication in order to bring the message home, the course also covers understanding an audience, developing applications, using illustrations well, and delivering sermons effectively. The concluding units discuss unique preaching approaches to various biblical genres.

Latin

This course is designed to bring new students to a reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. Students are introduced to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd noun declensions; nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative, and vocative cases; 3rd person present active/passive indicative verb forms, all forms of all types of adjectives in the positive degree, and over 200 Latin vocabulary words.

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers demonstratives and relative pronouns, 4th and 5th noun declensions, deponents, infinitives and participles. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress from reading simplified passages from the Vulgate to lightly edited passages.

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers the imperfect and future tenses, adverbs, gerunds, future passive participles, and gerundives, present subjunctive. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress to be able to read unadapted verses and passages from the Vulgate.  

This course continues to teach reading knowledge of Classical, Medieval, and Reformation-era Latin. Students will study readings from the Latin Bible and exercises in Latin composition. The course covers the perfect verb system, future active participles and supines, perfect and future infinitives, narrative and contrafactual uses of the subjunctive. Students will continue to learn over 200 Latin words and will progress to be able to read unadapted passages from the Vulgate and Reformation-era translations of the Bible.

Hebrew

In this course students take the first step towards fluency in biblical Hebrew. Students learn the core mechanics of biblical Hebrew, including basic vocabulary, the verb stems, grammar, syntax, as well as how to use the apparatus in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS), or Hebrew Old Testament.

In this course students continue their study of Hebrew, learning the remaining verbal conjugations (Imperative, Cohortative, and Jussive), infinitives, participles, sentence syntax, and weak and strong verbs in the various verbal stems (Niphal, Piel, Pual, Hiphil, Hophal, Hithpael).

In this course students are introduced to basic biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax while reading and translating Jonah chapters 1, 3 and 4. Additionally students strengthen their skills through reading and translating the whole of the book of Ruth, with emphasis given to developing reading and composition skills and considerations of exegesis and history of interpretation.

In this course students continue their study of basic biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax while reading and translating 1 Kings 17-20. Additionally students strengthen their skills through reading and translating Exodus 1-4, with emphasis given to developing reading and composition skills and considerations of exegesis and history of interpretation.

In this course students will continue to learn Hebrew grammar and vocabulary by translating Genesis 37-41 and Deuteronomy 4–6. Building on what you have learned in Hebrew Reading 1 and 2, you will master Level 3 grammar topics and, upon completion, you will know all vocabulary that appears in Genesis 37–41 and Deuteronomy 4–6. Your guided reading of these Old Testament chapters will thus deepen your understanding of the structure and forms of Hebrew narrative.

In this course students will continue to learn Hebrew grammar and vocabulary by translating Genesis 1-4 and selections from Genesis 11–22. Building on what you have learned in Hebrew Reading 1, 2 and 3 you will master Level 4 grammar topics as well as be introduced some of the features of Biblical Hebrew poetry and, upon completion, you will know all vocabulary that appears in the texts from Genesis you have studied.

Greek

In this course students are introduced to the fundamentals of biblical Greek. Utilizing material from Bill Mounce, students study pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, with particular focus on Greek nouns, pronouns, and indicative verbs. Students will gain exposure to frequently-appearing words in the Greek New Testament, develop skills to parse nouns, pronouns, and verbs, and produce translations of basic sentences.
In this course students continue their study of the fundamentals of biblical Greek. Utilizing material from Bill Mounce, students study vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, with particular focus on Greek nouns, pronouns, and indicative verbs. Students will gain exposure to frequently-appearing words in the Greek New Testament, develop skills to parse most Greek forms in the NT, and produce translations of sentences with limited aids.
This course is the first of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students study pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate chapters 1–3 of the Gospel of John with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse verb and noun forms, consider verbal tense and aspect, and translate basic texts. This course requires that students complete non-credit BibleMesh’s First Steps course prior to beginning.
This course is the second of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5–7) with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse more complex verb, noun, and pronoun forms, consider verbal mood, and translate intermediate texts.

Supported by the textbook Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics // Basics of New Testament Syntax by Daniel B. Wallace along with teaching videos by the author, this course introduces second-year Greek students to syntax and exegesis of the Greek New Testament.

This course is the third of a three-course sequence that teaches the fundamentals of biblical Greek. In this course students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as they translate First Thessalonians with the aid of a reading guide. Students will develop skills to parse most Greek forms and translate difficult NT texts with limited aids.

In this course students will learn about discourse features of biblical narrative as they read through the first half of the Gospel of Mark. Course concepts include the discourse-level function of Greek conjunctions, background and foreground analysis, principles of Greek word order, and analyzing structural boundaries. Students will see how these concepts offer powerful exegetical insights into the meaning of the Gospel of Mark.

History

Based on material from Everett Ferguson, this course offers a contextual overview of how the Christian church developed and spread. This genesis and expansion did not occur in a vacuum, but in a setting of times, cultures, and events that both influenced and were influenced by the church. This course examines the link between world history and church history. In particular, it explores the church’s development from the days of Jesus to the years preceding the Reformation. It surveys the Roman, Greek, and Jewish worlds; the church’s relationship to the Roman Empire; the roles of art and architecture, literature and philosophy in church history; and much more, spanning the first through thirteenth centuries.
Based on material from John D. Woodbridge and Frank A. James III, this course offers a contextual overview of how the Christian church spread and developed from the period just prior to the Reformation through the twentieth century. This course also examines the link between world history and church history, detailing the times, cultures, and events that both influenced and were influenced by the church. Primary attention is given to the history of Christianity in the West, but the course also covers developments in Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

Theology

This course explores the literary, historical, and theological issues behind the Old Testament and its various books. Featuring material from Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton, the course aims to guide students in knowing God and understanding his redemptive work more fully. For each Old Testament book, this course addresses background information, purpose, message, structure, and major themes, while considering issues such as interpretation, geography, archaeology, history, formation of the Old Testament canon, and the Old Testament’s relationship to the New Testament.

Featuring video lectures by  Wayne Grudem along with his published Systematic Theology, this course introduces the doctrines of God’s Word, God, and humanity, providing a strong emphasis on the scriptural basis for each doctrine; clear teaching, with technical terms kept to a minimum; and a contemporary approach.

Featuring video lectures by Wayne Grudem along with his published Systematic Theology, this course introduces the doctrines of Christ, the Holy Spirit, redemption, the church, and the future, providing a strong emphasis on the scriptural basis for each doctrine; clear teaching, with technical terms kept to a minimum; and a contemporary approach.

Incorporating the textbook Know Why You Believe by K. Scott Oliphint along with teaching videos by the author, this course introduces you to compelling reasons for a belief in God, the Bible, and the foundational teachings of the Christian faith.

Structured from the textbook Moral Choices by ethicist and professor Scott Rae, this course is designed to help students develop a sound and current basis for making ethical decisions in today’s complex postmodern culture — not only outlining the distinctive elements of Christian ethics while avoiding undue dogmatism, but also introducing other ethical systems and their key historical proponents, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Immanuel Kant.

Featuring video lectures and commentary by scholar Gregg Allison, this course presents the historical development of theology by a topical-chronological arrangement, setting out the history one doctrine at a time. This approach concentrates on major tenets of Christian doctrine, exploring its formulation in the early church through the Middle Ages, Reformation, and post-Reformation era, and finally into the modern period. This course provides a thorough introduction to the development of the doctrines of Scripture, God, Humanity, and Sin.

Featuring video lectures and commentary by scholar Gregg Allison, this course presents the historical development of theology by a topical-chronological arrangement, setting out the history one doctrine at a time. This approach concentrates on major tenets of Christian doctrine, exploring its formulation in the early church through the Middle Ages, Reformation, and post-Reformation era, and finally into the modern period. This course provides a thorough introduction to the development of the doctrines of Christ, the Holy Spirit, Redemption, the Church, and the Last Things.

Based on material from Justin Holcomb, this course provides an overview of the main historical developments in Christian thought by exploring the historical context and theological contributions of thirteen historic creeds and councils in church history. It aims to provide an introduction to various traditions within Christian history and to explore the ways the church has wrestled with the most important questions concerning Christian belief.

This course provides on overview of the doctrine of the Trinity, with an eye towards consideration of how the doctrine is a spiritual exercise, and how it influences the interpretation of scripture and the task of theology as whole. Utilizing material from Fred Sanders, this course covers such topics as the nature of language and knowledge related to the God’s self-revelation, inter-Trinitarian relations and the specific mission of the Son and Holy Spirit, and the task of a Trinitarian interpretation of the Old and New Testament.

Old Testament

This course explores the literary, historical, and theological issues behind the Old Testament and its various books. Featuring material from Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton, the course aims to guide students in knowing God and understanding his redemptive work more fully. For each Old Testament book, this course addresses background information, purpose, message, structure, and major themes, while considering issues such as interpretation, geography, archaeology, history, formation of the Old Testament canon, and the Old Testament’s relationship to the New Testament.

This course introduces the content of the first five books of the Old Testament, considering background material and the theology of each book, and how each book fits in the story of salvation. Examining the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the course focuses on narrative and intertextuality. The course’s priority is to help students gain a working knowledge of the scriptural accounts themselves, as well as an awareness of how they fit within the larger biblical context.

This course offers a survey of the entire book of Genesis that explores its message in light of the Bible’s grand story. This course focuses on the interpretation of Genesis within its historical and literary context in order to guide readers today to live out God’s story faithfully in their own context. In line with this purpose, OT scholar Tremper Longman III helpfully organizes the material of each passage into three sections: Listen to the Story; Explain the Story; and Live the Story. This story-centric approach facilitates a deeper understanding of the book of Genesis in today’s world.

This course offers a survey of the Old Testament prophetic literature that presents the message of each prophet in its historical and biblical context and then tracks that message through the New Testament to challenge students with what it means for them today. Featuring material from J. Daniel Hays, this course focuses on synthesizing the message of the prophets, which enables students to grasp the major contours of the prophetic books clearly and concisely. After identifying what the message meant for ancient Israel, Hays helps students to move toward theological application today, enabling them to gain a better understanding of God and the relationship between God and his people.

Biblical Interpretation

Based on the popular textbook Grasping God’s Word by Old Testament scholar J. Daniel Hays and New Testament expert J. Scott Duvall, this course provides a simple and clear introduction to reading the Word of God carefully and in context, interpreting it, and then applying it faithfully. Designed to follow Hays and Duvall’s memorable “Interpretive Journey” framework, this course equips students with foundational, trustworthy principles of sound biblical interpretation.

The Biblical Story: Full Bible Survey is a course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, this OT and NT survey demonstrates the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This course is divided into 7 Eras (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel, After the Exile, Jesus, and the Church).

The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story NT Survey covering Eras 5-7 (After the Exile, Jesus, and the Church).

The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story OT Survey covering Eras 1-4 (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel).

New Testament

In this course NT scholar Robert H. Gundry provides essential historical and cultural background information and carefully examines the content of each book in the New Testament. Topics and issues discussed in the course are tied to assigned readings from the across the entire New Testament. Students encounter commentary on the various readings to provide additional insight and guide them in the interpretive process.
This course provides and introductory survey to the study of the Gospel accounts in the New Testament. It examines the nature and content of each of the four books, and will consider their historical, religious, and cultural backgrounds. Additionally, it examines questions surrounding the study of the four books, including the historical Jesus, the historical reliability of the gospels, and the teaching and actions of Jesus.
This course introduces the cultural and theological background of Hebrews and the general epistles (James through Jude). Taught from an evangelical perspective by respected New Testament scholar Karen Jobes, the course addresses issues of historical relevance as well as connecting these ancient Scriptural books to Christian faith and practice today. Letters to the Church covers historical background for each book focusing on authorship, genre, date, and content, as well as an exploration of the major themes in each book.
The Biblical Story is a two-part course which presents an overview of Scripture’s storyline and main themes from Genesis to Revelation, including a survey of the intertestamental period. This overview includes characters, key events, theological concepts, and background material. A study in biblical theology, these two courses demonstrate the unity of the Bible’s sixty-six books. It explores the manner in which Scripture is centered on Jesus Christ in the overarching biblical story. This story is divided into 7 Eras, with The Biblical Story OT Survey covering Eras 1-4 (Creation, the Patriarchs, Moses, and Israel).

This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Peter H. Davids, offers a comprehensive exploration of the theology of James, 1-2 Peter, and Jude, including introductory issues and major themes, and also shows how each book relates to the broad picture of New Testament theology.

In this course, New Testament scholars Bruce W. Longenecker and Todd D. Still offer students a thorough introduction to the life of the apostle Paul and the New Testament books he authored. This course seeks to situate study of the apostle in proper perspective by first looking at Paul’s life before and after his encounter with the risen Christ en route to Damascus. It then examines each of Paul’s letters individually, before finally synthesizing the Pauline writings in order to highlight the main strands of Paul’s theologizing—all the while keeping in mind the particular context of first-century Christianity.
In this course, notable scholar Thomas R. Schreiner offers students a focused introduction to deeper study of Galatians. Through graphic representations of translations and succinct summaries of main ideas, Schreiner presents Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians with precision and accuracy. Focused on the textual structure of the book, the Galatians course enables students to better understand the literary elements of Galatians. Students will also come to better comprehend the author’s revolutionary goals and the book’s vital implication for the church today.
This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Gary M. Burge, examines the meaning of John’s Gospel and its application in the twenty-first century. Students will learn about the text itself, explore issues in John’s culture and in ours that help us understand the ultimate meaning of each passage, and discover ways in which the theology of the book of John can be understood and lived out in modern culture.
This course, featuring commentary and video lectures by New Testament scholar Douglas Moo, provides students with an overview to the book of Romans. Students receive commentary on the text itself, explore issues in Paul’s culture and the present day that help provide understanding of the ultimate meaning of each passage, and suggests ways in which the eternal theology of Romans can be understood and lived out in modern culture.

To begin your studies and enroll in a course, you will first need to apply the BibleMesh Institute. Details will be sent to you on how to enroll in your courses once you are accepted into a program. The Institute provides year-round, open enrollment so you can begin at any time. Apply to the BibleMesh Institute